[Question #1073] Conclusive?

51 months ago
HIV RNA Test - Negative at 20 days
HIV Ag/Ab EIA - Negative at 20 days
HIV Ag/Ab EIA 4th Gen - Non reactive at 7 weeks and 3 days. 

Are these conclusive?

Also I went to my doctor and have started the HPV vaccination process with Gardisol. Will this prevent all types of HPV?

I appreciate all help. I would rather come here and donate to a good cause then seek answers elsewhere. 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
51 months ago
Sorry to see you back again, and so soon. My goal in your previous threads was to convince you there was no risk of HIV, and to reassure you about test results. These HIV questions were answered in your last thread, when I wrote "...the combination of RNA plus antibody testing is definitive by 20 days. As an example, RNA or DNA testing, plus antibody, is used to test all blood collected before transfusion, and has been 100% successful in preventing transfusion related HIV infecitons." Your test results are conclusive; the last test (7 weeks) was unnecessary.

Gardasil-9, the current version of the vaccine, protects against 9 HPV types. There are over 100 HPVs, but these 9 account for 90% of genital warts and 90% of cancers.

Regards--  HHH, MD

---
51 months ago
Hello Dr, thank you for your reply. I know that I should have taken your word in that my results were conclusive, but I must have read over 100 of your replies to people with lower risks than mine where you advised them to take a 4th gen test 28+ days out from the exposure. I guess I just needed that reassurance for myself. 

Please let me make sure I understand how these tests work. 

If I was in fact HIV positive, then a negative RNA test would mean that I would have a detectable amount of antibodies in order for the RNA to be undetectable, therefore a 4th gen test at 20 days would be reactive. And vice versa. Also at 7 weeks there would definitely be a detectable amount of antibodies/antigens for my result to show up positive.

Is this correct?  Please correct me if I am wrong. 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
51 months ago
When I have recommended HIV testing for someone who asked questions on this or other forums, usually I made clear that the recommendations was for reassurance, not because there was any real risk.

Partly correct, except once RNA testing is positive, it usually remains positive for life, except in people on effective anti-HIV treatment. You are confusing RNA testing with HIV antigen testing, which is a component of the 4th generation test (along with antibody). See your previous thread and my comments above. Once again, you are asking for confirmation of what you have already been told. The important thing is that your test results are conclusive:  you do not have HIV. I'm not going to repeat my reasoning yet again.

I'm closing this thread at this time. Do not return again to ask these questions. Repetative anxiety driven questions are not permitted; if you do, the new question will be deleted without reply, and without refund of the posting fee.

---