[Question #2063] Possible STD discovered in semen sample

46 months ago
Hi. I had protected sex with an escort. The condom was a little big but I routinely checked for slippage and there was none. A week later I had a sperm sample taken for fertility purposes as my wife and I have had issues getting pregnant with second child. Results came back with real high white blood cell count and lab told me this is due to possible bacteria from STD. I have to go back for resample and urine and swab. I'm freaking out with the timing. What are the chances I contracted something and a week later my semen analysis caught it. Could the high white blood count be something else? Blood test came back clean. I'm not really showing any symptoms. I've always had a little burning occasionally after peeing but now I'm freaking out and probably over analyzing that. Any info or advice would be helpful. Thanks
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
46 months ago
Welcome to our Forum.  I'll try to help.  The finding of elevated numbers of WBCs in your ejaculate is a non-specific finding which reflect inflammation somewhere in your genital tract.  STIs can cause this, as can urinary tract infections and a number of non-specific causes including other inflammatory illnesses.  I doubt however that this reflects and STI acquired from condom protected sex recently.  Condoms remain the most effective means of reducing risk for STIs and when worn throughout sex are highly effective for preventing infection.  (Further, when condoms fail, they break wide open, leaving no doubt that there is a problem- they do not leak "a little").

In your situation I would suggest the following:
1.  The fact that you have had occasional burning on urination suggests that you may have a chronic infection of some sort which went unnoticed.
2.  Have your urine cultured for the bacteria that commonly cause UTIs.
3..  Have your urine tested for common STIs such as gonorrhea or chlamydia, these are typically symptomatic but the symptoms can be mild and the infections can smolder for long periods of time with minor symptoms.

Even if all of these tests are negative, your doctor may want to empirically treat you.  This however is a decision for you and your doctor to discuss after you have been carefully examined and tested.

I hope these comments are helpful.  EWH
---
46 months ago
Thanks doc. Was looking for some professional reasurance. You gave that to me for now. Thanks for reply.