[Question #2327] diabetes (blood pricks) STD risks?

44 months ago
Hi,

A few years ago, I was diagnosed as a type-1 diabetic.  Like most type1s, I prick my finger a few times a day to monitor my blood sugar.

My question is: as someone who pricks my finger throughout the day, how does this change my risks for getting and transmitting STDS, particularly my hand in contact with a female partner's genitals?

I am not fretting over a past event, I have only been with a trusted partner since my diagnosis.   but I am now single and  want to be responsible moving forward, what should I do (or not do?).

For me, a finger prick gives a nice drop of blood on the skin, but after I wipe the skin, the wound seems to clot almost immediately.  Within a few minutes the wound is barely visible and does not visibly bleed any more (even when squeezed).  But perhaps there are trace amounts of blood on my finger, and perhaps a small wound is still there that is permeable to STDS (in particular HIV).

Thoughts?


Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
44 months ago
Welcome to the Forum. You ask a good question.  Careful scientific studies have shown that as the body reacts to STIs which cause genital ulcers (specifically syphilis and herpes), lymphocytes, the target cells for HIV concentrate in the base of the sores increasing the risk for becoming infected, if exposed, slightly (less than 1% on any specific encounter).  On the other hand cuts and scrapes, while theoretically offering a "doorway" to easier infection, have not been proven to increase risk for HIV or any other STI in careful scientific study.  I would put your finger prick blood sticks used to monitor your diabetes in the same category.  I have never heard or read in the scientific literature of finger sticks as increasing risk for any STI.  I would not worry about this in the least if I were you. 
I hope this comment helps.  Please let me know if any part of this comment is unclear or there are additional questions.EWH
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43 months ago
Dr. Hook,

Thanks for the reply. I understand your response.  And  I am rather happy to hear I don't need to carry a rubber glove in my wallet (that would be quite the turn off, for me and mostly her).



Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
43 months ago
Thank you.  I'm pleased that I could be helpful.  Take care.  EWH
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