[Question #2537] Oral HSV2 to Oral transmission

45 months ago
I am female and have HSV2 genital and my male partner does not. He performed oral sex on me at a time that I did not think I was having an outbreak. It's been over a week but today he noticed a very tiny fissure on the corner of his mouth. We are both worried I passed HSV2 to him orally.Adding on to that, we are scared that if he has oral HSV2 that he could now pass it onto his children through kissing, drinking, eating after them etc. I can’t find any information online about passing HSV2 oral to oral. Are there statistics on this?
    Terri Warren, RN, Nurse Practitioner
    Terri Warren, RN, Nurse Practitioner
    45 months ago
    While it is possible to acquire HSV 2, orally, I have definitely seen it, it is uncommon.
    When you say that your partner doesn't have HSV 2, does that mean that he has tested for it and tests negative?
    Fissures in the corners of the mouth can be herpes, yes, but also, quite commonly something called angular chelitis.  Look it up and see what you think.  I also think that new HSV 2 orally would probably look a bit more dramatic than a very tiny fissure and usually a new infection would show up on the lips rather than in the corner of the mouth.  Do you know if he has ever had a cold sore on his lip?  If yes, new HSV 2 would look just like that.  And if he has HSV 1 orally (cold sores) he should just not kiss the children when he has an active cold sore.
    At some point down the road, if he's not had an IgG test for HSV 2, he could have one and see his status but he should wait about 12 weeks from the encounter you are concerned about.
    BTW are you taking daily antiviral therapy?  If yes, that will help reduce the risk of infection to your partner

    Terri

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    45 months ago
    Partner has not been tested. We are waiting 3 months for antibodies to show up better if I gave it to him.  He has never had cold sores in the past.  Looked it up and on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being way worse than his, it's a 10.  There really isn't even redness around it, and I wouldn't even think it's a millimeter long in size.   I am not on antiviral meds.   I did quite a bit of reading last night (probably your whole question/answer forum) after he was concerned about transmission to his children.  HSV2 oral would be extremely hard to transmit non-sexually? What precautions would you take to insure that?  Am I correct that HSV1 oral can be transmitted nonsexually, but standard hand washing always  and no kissing only during outbreaks would prevent that?  What about sharing drinks, food, whatever else with HSV1, can it be transmitted that way to others?  And then genital HSV1 and genital HSV2 would require oral sexual contact or intercourse  to be transmitted?  With genital, I don't have to worry about kissing and general household sharing of items? Thank you. 
    Terri Warren, RN, Nurse Practitioner
    Terri Warren, RN, Nurse Practitioner
    45 months ago
    I think you mean his is a 1 right?  Not severe at all?  I cannot imagine that what you are describing is new herpes, really. 
    Even if this is herpes, which I seriously doubt that it is, transmission to his children is not going to happen.  If he gets sores orally, he should simply not kiss them while the sores are present.  And HSV 1 is the same - people just shouldn't kiss their children on the mouth when they have a cold sore.  I am not concerned about sharing drinks, etc.  but I do recommend that people not share lipsticks or lip glosses as they stay warm and moist and may have accumulated virus directly on them.  Genital HSV 1 and 2 need sexual contact to be transmitted, correct.  you do not need to give a second thought to kissing or general household contact, correct.

    Terri
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