[Question #2893] Hypothyroidism and HIV testing

41 months ago
Good evening, 

I had unprotcted sex with a male for about 2 minutes, he didnt ejaculate in me, and came in my mouth. 

i got tested for everything at 9 weeks, and again at 11 weeks with an antigen/antibody test, and i do have an underactive thyroid. what are the risks with my disorder and the tests? could it take longer for antibodies to produce?
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
41 months ago
Welcome to our Forum.  The exposure you describe was relatively low risk and your tests now prove that you were not infected with HIV through this exposure.  I say this with confidence for the following reasons:
1. Most heterosexual men do not have HIV.
2. The risk for acquiring HIV from a single unprotected exposure, if he happened to be infected is less than 1 infection for every 2000 exposures for unprotected vaginal intercourse and less than 1 infection per 10,000 exposures from performing oral sex on an infected person.
3.  All HIV antigen/antibody  test results are conclusive any time more than 6 weeks after exposure- both your 9 and 11 week results are definitive and no further testing is indicated.
4.  Hypothyroidism is not known to change the risk for acquiring HIV.

There is no reason for continuing concern for HIV related to the exposures that you describe.  Other STIs are more common than HIV- I hope you were also tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis as well.  EWH
 
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41 months ago
Thank you for your reply doctor.

My question is that does having an autoimmune disorder make antobodies produce slower? would Hypothyroidism be one of those cases?
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
41 months ago
I realize that much hypothyroidism is autoimmune in origin.  that does not change the answer.  There is nothing to suggest that having hypothyroidism, or any other autoimmune illness changes that accuracy (or timing) of tests for HIV.  In fact, the problem with autoimmune diseases is not too little antibody but too much.  EWH
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41 months ago
So mine produces too little, wouls that make a difference? 
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
41 months ago
Actually, as a person who is hypothyroid, it is thyroid hormone which your body produces too little of, not antibodies.  As I said before your tests are reliable and PROVE that you did not acquire HIV from the low risk exposure you have described.  There is no reason to worry further about the exposure you have described and no medical reason for further testing.  You are in  the clear.

This is my third response to your questions.  As per Form guidelines, this thread will be closed later today.  Take care and please don't worry.  EWH
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