[Question #3427] HPV

35 months ago
Doctor,

Sorry ahead of time for the details. Around 2 years ago, I went to a minute clinic and they said I had gential warts. There were a few smooth bumps on my penis shaft and also one stalk like wart that projected on my shaft as well. This clinic could not std checks however they look at the above described on my penis and the nurse practitioner said it was GW. She got me a prescription  and it took care of the warts ( not 100 percent confident they were warts) 2 years later I have noticed small bumps near the dark line from being circumcised. These bumps are small and have some texture to them. Very difference from the bumps 2 years ago. I order some Creme off line and it has started to clear these up. I recently had protected sex with someone and unprotected oral sex. My fear is I have now infected her. Should I reach out to her. Would these be the same warts from two years ago or different ones. They are in different places and look completely different. 

With Respect 
35 months ago
I’m 30, the girl I engaged sexually with is 35 and has only had 2 sex partners in the past.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
35 months ago
Welcome to the Forum.  I'll try to help.  It is very good of you to worry that the bumps you have noted may be HIV and to be concerned that you could have infected her but I think that your concern is misplaced.  One or more of you may have HPV infections, either asymptomatically or as genital warts as these infections are very common.  Within 3 years of the onset of sexually activity, on average, even 50% of monogamous persons have acquired HPV.  For persons with multiple partners the rates are even higher.  From a medical perspective however, for all but a fraction (a small fraction of 1%) of those who are infected with HPV the disease is nothing more than a nuisance- sometimes cosmetically, sometimes otherwise.  Thus we typically suggest that clients not worry about warts if present and that, if a person has warts/HPV, there is no absolute need to notify sexual partners. 

Your case is slightly different as you do not know for sure that what you have noticed are warts.  To find out, my advice would be to see a dermatologist.  There are many, many dermatological problems that are all too often mis-identified as warts and even treated as such.  I am not sure what cream you are using but that the lesions you have noticed may be responding does not necessarily mean that they are warts. 

If the lesions you had two years ago were warts, it is unlikely that the ones you have noticed more recently are warts.  When warts recur after treatment, they typically do so in 3-6 months after initial resolution.

I've provided a substantial amount of information above for you to digest.   I hope it is helpful. After you have done so, you may want to use your up to two follow-up questions for me to provide more information.  EWH


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35 months ago
Most people know they have gential warts hpv within  3 months being rough 15 weeks after exposure. Is this true? If what I had or have is GW, it’s been over 3 months and they have no signs. I know that is not telling but encouraging.  Does a pap for a female let them know if they have the low risk GW virus? Is there any test for men? Do you see a cure anytime in the near future, I know there is now a vaccine.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
35 months ago
Correct.  Genital warts typically occur about 3 months after the exposure that led to infection, sometimes taking up to six months to become apparent.  if there is no evidence of infection at three, and certainly at 6 moths after exposure, there is no reason for concern. 

Yes, HPV infections, including low risk HPV types are commonly detected on the PAP smear.

There is no recommended test for HPV infection in men.

The concept of cure of HPV is sometimes debated by scientists. Most HPV virus typically becomes non-detectable within six months of initial detection and nearly all is cleared by two years after infection.  When the virus is no longer detectable, it is non-infectious to others but may remain latently present within the body.   Thus for all practical purposes (in terms of being detectable and infectious to others, nearly all HPV infections are self limited and cure themselves within two years of acquisition).  EWH
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35 months ago
If GW hpv is transmitted via oral and I have it oral. Should I not share with my children food and drinks. Am I at risk of spreading it to my childeren. What are the risk of spreading it if I have it orally to my partner. 
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
35 months ago
While HPV can be transmitted through oral sex, it is a biologically less efficient process than through genital contact.  Thus rates of oral HPV infection are considerably lower than rates of genital infection.  Like genital infections however, most oral infections are self limited and clear without consequence for the infected persons.  Oral HPV is also typically asymptomatic, 

I would not worry in the least about transmitted oral infection, IF you have it (there is no evidence that you do).  Certainly there is no need for precaution in terms of shared drinks or straws or in terms of kissing.  Further I would not suggest that oral infection (once again, IF present) would be transmitted efficiently to sex partners through oral sex and see no reason to worry about this possibility.

My sense is that you are worrying more about this than is needed or is healthy for you.  Please re-read my earlier comments as well as other posts on this Forum on the topic of HPV.  I think you will see that Dr. Handsfield and I are both quite consistent in our approach and in our sincere, science-based statements that HPV is really nor a major health concern for 99+% of persons with the infection.

This is my 3rd reply to your questions.  Thus, as per Forum guidelines, this thread will be closed without further answers in a few minutes.  EWH
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