[Question #3444] Syphilis on hand

36 months ago

My question is about a recent exposure. A friend of mine and I were very drunk and took 2 csw to our hotel room. One of them gave me a condom protected handjob. During this time I was rubbing her vagina vigorously. 


1. What are my risks of catching an std, in particular Syphilis on my hand that was rubbing her. I don’t not recall inserting my fingers in her vagina just rubbing the clitoris and outer lips.  The event took place in Germany and csw were from Eastern Europe.


2. Given that I was very drunk I am somewhat worried that the csw might have put my friends used condom on me before giving me a handjob. What are my risks there? 


Should I get tested? If yes, for what and when?


Thanks

Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
36 months ago
 Welcome to our forum. I will be glad to answer your questions. The encounter that you describe was very low risk. Most commercial sex workers do not have STI's and among STI's, Syphilis is relatively rare.    In addition,  for Syphilis to be transmitted a lesion must be present and directly contacted.  The lesions of syphilis are usually visible if looked for and classically are firm to the touch and therefore would have probably been detected by touching when you rubbed her vagina  if present.   Typically masturbation is considered safe sex and STI's are not acquired or transmitted during that sort of activity.   

 Similarly reuse of condoms is virtually unheard of and most unlikely in your situation. As you might imagine, there are no data on the possibility of transmission of used STI's through reuse of condoms. 

 From your description I see no medical reason for testing. However if it would be comforting for you, you can test for classical bacterial STIs  like gonorrhea and chlamydia using a urine test and have accurate results at any time  more than 2 to 3 days following the event. For HIV testing currently available HIV antigen/antibody tests  provide results that are 99% accurate four weeks following exposure and These tests are entirely reliable six weeks after exposure. None of the activities that you describe suggest any risk whatsoever for HIV. 

 I hope that these responses are helpful to you.   EWH
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