[Question #3693] Giardisil vaccine completion follow up

33 months ago

This question is a follow up to my  previous question, I do realize I have asked 3 questions, but this is the only question I have left and didn't quite realize that it was not entirely clear for me. So I apologize. The doctors have done an extremely excellent job and lowered my anxiety tremendously concerning hpv. So to be clear, I'm not "feeding my anxiety" on this question, it just wasn't clear to me so please do not feel as if I do not take everything you say with complete faith because I am, but wanted to be certain I understood you, so thank you for answering my final question.

 

1. It was  to me if that was for this particular situation- if I had been exposed to someone with HPV-16 recently, and I did not have an infection yet, but received two doses of the Giardisil vaccine, would I prevent infection from that particular person?  (I wasn't sure if he was answering that particular question or if he was saying in general). I understand that most people are 
2. I wanted to be clear that he was referring to this particular incident of a recent exposure, yet the vaccine would prevent infection from that exposure if caught early enough and infection hadn't taken place yet

 


My previous question- "If you've been exposed to HPV by someone , but yet to have an infection from that exposure, and in between the time of exposure to possible infection the Giardisil vaccine has taken effect, would you be able to prevent that infection from that prior exposure from occurring?  I read Dr. Hansfield answer a question from a gentlemen about exposure to HPV and preventing infection to the cancer causing strains. I believe I understood it as yes, you can avoid that infection if it was exposure but had not caused infection yet.... but I'm not entirely sure if I am understanding correctly."
Dr. Hook answered-  "In your case between your prior experiences/partners and the fact that by now you should have taken at least two doses of vaccine, I would expect you to be protected."
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
33 months ago
Welcome back to the Forum.  I must admit, your specific question remains a bit difficult to follow.  Here are my replies:

If you were exposed to a sexual partner who had HPV 16 and had received two of the planned three doses of HPV vaccine, based on large studies it would be expected that you would be protected from infection.  Please understand that the figures we provide regarding levels of protection are based on huge studies with many participants and thus what we would say is that you are almost certainly protected.  It is not scientifically possible to be more precise than that.

I hope this helps.  EWH
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33 months ago
My apologies, let me clarify with the specific scenario.
I was exposed to HPV-16 and was tested for it, which came back negative. In between being exposed in January and being tested in April(neg results), I completed my second round of the HPV vaccine. Can I assume that because I tested negative for HPV-16 a few weeks after I finished my 2nd vaccine that I am no longer susceptible to infection from this particular exposure in January?  
In summary, the vaccination was completed in between an exposure and a possible infection. so would that infection be prevented in this case. 

My question arises because of the understanding that the vaccine prevents infection, and that a virus can hang around for a while before it becomes infectious from what I understand. Therefore, the only wrinkle is that my completion of the second round was in between exposure and the possibility of infection. In this particular case, I think if I understand you correctly, I would prevent any possible infection, based on the large studies. 

I hope that helps. Sorry for any confusion. If needed, I can clarify more


Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
33 months ago
Yes, you should be confident that you did not get HPV-16 from the exposure in January that you have described.  I really would not worry about this and continue to think that perhaps you are overly concerned about this.  EWH
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33 months ago
So you're saying the vaccine did in fact prevent any HPV-16 infection and any further HPV-16 infection from the previous exposure in january? 
Even though the completion of the vaccine was after the exposure it can still prevent an infection, doesn't have to be before contact, just before infection? 

Once again, my apologies, but cementing this for me is important and with this last question answered, it will leave me with certainty. And thank you for your time, I really do appreciate your tolerance of these questions
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
33 months ago
I really do not understand your desperation.  In your statement above, attributing the fact that there is no evidence that you acquired HPV from an encounter which occurred before you completed your course of HPV vaccine to the vaccine is putting two and two together to get 7.  Her is what the situation is:

1.  You started the HPV vaccine. 
2.  You had an encounter and, I guess, a known exposure to HPV 16 after the 2nd vaccination.
3. Scientific studies show that most people receiving the HPV vaccination have protective immunity to infection with the HPV types in the vaccine (including HPV 16).  Statistically you should have had a vaccine-related level of protection. 
4.  You were, by your account, exposed to HPV 16.  Scientific studies show that most single exposures do not lead to infection.  More exposures, more likely to have infection but, even with many exposures, not all persons acquire infection.
5.  You tested with a commercial HPV test despite the fact that such testing is not recommended for men by the CDC, by us, or by other experts.  Performance characteristics of the test are unknown and have been told to you by the people who sold it to you. The test was negative.
5.    There is no evidence of any sort that you have HPV 16 at this time,  Whether this is because of the vaccine, because you were not going to acquire it, or because the test was wrong is unknown

End of story.  To try to attribute causally to having a negative test is simply not scientifically possible.  Further, even if you have acquired HPV (there is NO evidence or reason to believe you did) is simply not scientifically possible.  IF you had acquired HPV 16, there is a >99% chance that the infection would go away on its own over time.  You really must have more important things to worry about.

You need to move on.  I will not provide you with further responses and must warn you that future posts on this topic may not be answered and your posting fees may not be returned.  My sincere advice is that what you would benefit from is addressing your concerns with a mental health professional who might help you to address your concerns.  Such counseling is helpful for many persons, particularly those who may have suffered abuse in the past.  This will end my contributions to this thread. You may reply but there will be no further responses from me and the thread will be closed later today.  I wish you the best.  EWH
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33 months ago
Dr Hook, you have answered all my other questions but the main question is still unclear after reading your response- 
- the vaccine was completed AFTER  the exposure, my question is does that still prevent infection if it hasnt happened. Or does it have to be completed before to prevent infection? 

I appreciate the responses and the advice. I hope you understand that I ask because I am interested in safe sex for future partners and something that probably takes you a few minutes to answers allows me to understand have a lifetime of reassurance. I understand all of the advice you gave me and it is helpful, yet I set out with a question and I wanted to understand that concept. I’m not trying to waste your valuable time, please know that. You’re helping me out and your empathy here as a doctor is much appreciated 
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
33 months ago
You are not reading my answers, or choosing not to hear them. Scientific studies show that the majority of people who have received two doses of HPV vaccine, before the 3rd dose, are protected from infection.  EWH
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