[Question #3901] Could I have STD from massage?

37 months ago
About 5 months ago I went to a massage parlor.  I had gone to different ones before without incident, but at this one the lady suddenly removed the sheet to expose me and the bent down and licked my penis twice to offer me oral sex.  I was shocked and said no but she then proceeded to masturbate me anyway.  My penis never entered her mouth.
 I left quickly and washed myself at a restroom then went home and bathed fully.  I was freaking out over possible STDs.  Two days later I started feeling slight tingling at my urethra and went to see a doctor about a possible UTI.  Urine culture was clean.  A couple weeks later I started feeling irritation after peeing and went to a urologist.  He did both a urine analysis and culture and both were clean.  No wbc, etc.  
I decided I could have sex with my wife again and did so, but felt like I might still have something so I tried avoiding it.  My urologist never did an STD test but I've never had any discharge or pain during urination.  Just the occasional dripping after peeing (urine only) and slight irritation at urethal opening.
5 months have passed and I still feel slight irritation and I am horribly anxious and frustrated over it.  Should I get an STD test or just let it go?  I don't know how I would handle a positive test.
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
37 months ago
Welcome to the forum. Thanks for your question.

Your instincts were correct:  This was a zero risk exposure in regard to STDs and it was entirely safe to continue sex with your wife.  And the exam and testing by your urologist were negative. The usual cause of a sense of urethral irritation, without evidence of infection, is anxiety (e.g. over a regretted sexual choice) magnifying trivial symptoms or even normal body sensations that otherwise would be ignored or not even noticed. In addition, no STD would continue to cause such symptoms for 5 months. But that time, even untreated STDs would have been entirely cleared by the immune system.

So all is well, no worries! I have no suggestions for further evaluation. But if your symptoms continue, return to your urologist for further evaluation.

I hope these comments are helpful. Let me know if anything isn't clear.

HHH, MD
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37 months ago
Thanks Dr. Handsfield.  It appears from browsing other questions my situation is not uncommon.  My main fear was gonorrhea or chlamydia which from other information online could be without discharge and linger for years.  Almost all info online says you can acquire both through saliva/oral sex.   From what I read chlamydia just isn't transmitted via oral (not sure why), but gonorrhea can be.  So basically, if I never had the thick discharge I would not have gonorhrea?  Or at least this would be a very unlikely scenario?
One more quick question, my two urine cultures, one with microscopic examination, and urine analysis (no bacteria, no wbc, no protein, but with some mucus strands).  Are these relatively certain to catch honorees infections?
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
37 months ago
Indeed, questions like this are among the most common on this forum.

Until the last 3-4 years, the evidence suggested chlamydia rarely infects the oral cavity and therefore not a risk for oral to genital transmission. Improved testing methods shows oral infection is somewhat more common than previously believed, so oral transmission is possible. However, there still are virtually no cases of proved oral to genital transmission. It probably occurs but only very rarely. However, many education resources make no distinction between risk levels:  the advice is often the same for nearly zero risk vs small vs moderate vs high risk.

In any case, what you had doesn't count as oral sex anyway. For sure there is no risk by superficial contact with the tongue. Even with 10-15 min of deep oral sex to completion, oral sex is safe sex, with low risk of all STDs and virtually zero risk for some.

"So basically, if I never had the thick discharge I would not have gonorrhea?" Basically true; zero risk for practical purposes. " Or at least this would be a very unlikely scenario?" Correct.

Routine urine cultures are irrelevant. The bacteria detected are not STDs and not acquired by sex. Negative urinalysis doesn't mean much of anything one way or the other. Normal results slightly lower the chance of any urethral STD, but not by much. (No STD expert would ever do such testing in this situation. Waste of money, time and energy!)
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