[Question #4308] Follow up to #4217

31 months ago
Hi Drs,

Thank you so much for answering my previous questions. I have had a couple questions come to my mind recently and I would like to disclose more of the information as I just found out I can delete my post afterwards, regarding my previous post #4217. I know by putting in more information you'll be better able to understand the approximate risk.

My partner was a csw for appointment, on the higher cheap side but very attractive. She said this was her first time in the US and spoke bad english. She is from poland and said she worked in a school there. She had been in the US for several weeks at least. She texted me she does not have hiv, but she didnt say she tested.  This took place in Chicago, I live here.

I havent noticed any symptoms except lymph node swelling and fatigue but I had that slightly before, I may just be overthinking it. Also, the last time I was tested was 4 weeks exactly after my last protected exposure and just found out that 6 weeks has become the new standard....

I really appreciate everything you both have done and please excuse me as I am really an overly anxious person:

My questions:
1. Should I be worried about getting tested for hiv? it still has not been long enough for me to be tested
2. If you had to give me a percent risk on having hiv based on that specific scenario what would it be? (if you can ethically respond to that, I mean no disrespect)

H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
31 months ago
Welcome back, but sorry you found it necessary.

I read your previous thread and I agree with myself:  I would not change the advice I gave there. You were at virtually no risk of HIV from that event. In the 14 years I have been doing this and my previous forum on MedHelp, with thousands of questions about HIV risks etc, not one person who was worried about a potential exposure turned out to have caught HIV. You won't be the first. if and when that happens, almost certainly it will be a truly high risk situation (like unprotected sex between two men, one already infected) and not a minimal risk situation like yours.

1) Of course you should be tested when you reach 6 weeks after the sexual event, when you can have a conclusive antigen-antibody test. Almost every worried person should be tested, regardless of risk. It seems clear that a negative test will reassure you more than my opinion based on scientific probability and statistics.

2) Less than 1 chance in a few million.

HHH, MD
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31 months ago
Thank you Dr. Handsfield
31 months ago
How is it that hiv is so statistically unlikely to happen for heterosexual men and we see guys like Charlie sheen , magic Johnson, who have hiv? 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
31 months ago
Good question, but the answer isn't complicated. I don't know anything about Sheen's sex life, but Magic described having hundreds or even thousands of sex partners. I'm not saying heterosexual transmission doesn't happen. But the chance of transmission is low for any single exposure to an infected partner. But with lots and lots of such exposures, of course some people get infected. But even with cases like Sheen and Magic Johnson, the overall frequency of HIV in heterosexuals is far lower than in men who have sex with men. Most straight men and women in North America and Europe are at very low risk of getting HIV, even if they are quite sexually active.---
31 months ago
I was tested yesterday, after 6 weeks, antigen / antibody combo -  came back negative today.

I got 3 hand jobs and body rubs after that incident. And am done. 

I’m all good as far as hiv right?
30 months ago
Can someone please answer my last question?
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
30 months ago
Sorry I missed your follow-up question. As discussed above, you were not at risk for HIV, but your negative result is additional proof you did not catch HIV.---