[Question #4870] Hand-foot-and-mouth disease symptom of recent HIV infection?

27 months ago

Hello doctor, I would like to know whether hand-foot-and-mouth disease, which I had diagnosed about 18 months ago, is an indication of recent HIV infection? I’m aware that symptoms include a rash for example. 


I'm a gay man who had not had any other sort of sex apart from cock to cock frottage and mutual masturbation at the time of this diagnosis. The hand-foot-and-mouth  was diagnosed and treated with medication and never recurred. 


I suffer from health anxiety with regard to this issue. Overall my health is good. I don't engage in unprotected anal sex, or any anal sex at all, only occasionally cock frottage and oral sex, and never let any ejaculate in my mouth, although certainly another person’s semen has gotton on my penis during masturbation and frottage. I understand this is not a risk for HIV?


However, recently a partner did contract ghonorea in their throat only and, 4 days after exposure to him, I took a single dose of antibiotics as a precautionary measure (Azithromycin 2 500 mg. I had no symptoms and have not yet tested for ghonorea but want to know how long that medication would take to work before I do test. And whether I should be worried about HIV, keeping in mind my experience with hand-foot-and-mouth and the activities I described. One doctor told me it is not associated with HIV infection as a symptom but I wanted to check, as I don’t work with kids or have any, and I think hand foot and mouth is uncommon in adults.


Thank you.

Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
27 months ago
 Welcome to the forum. I'll be glad to come up. Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a childhood viral illness which is not related in any wayto HIV.  

 Regarding your 2nd question, the details of your exposure are not clear.  The issue of oral gonorrhea and your exposure is unclear to me as is the timing as well as whether and what sort of contact you had with this person.   Irrespective, if you were exposed, although the dose of azithromycin was lower than the dose which used to be recommended for Gonorrhea treatment, the medicine you took may well have cured an infection if there had been one present.   Recently however azithromycin resistance in gonorrhea has increased a bit and so if you were exposed it would be a good idea to test at the site of exposure. Testing at this time, should be accurate. EWH
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