[Question #5026] HIV Risk

25 months ago
I am travelling for a professional commitment. I checked into the hotel after a long day of travel, and as i entered the room, i sat on the bed.  After a couple of hours, I noticed that there was a blood stain on the bed, and i might have sat on it. I don't know how old the stain was, could have been just a few hours old. I am worried about contracting some kind of infection. Assuming that it was from somebody who was HIV positive, what is the risk of me contracting the infection? Should I get tested or go to the ED from some medications? I am really freaking out.
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
25 months ago
Welcome to the forum. Thanks for your quesiton.

Dried blood carries little or no risk for HIV or any other infection; and contact with your skin from sitting on it -- including genital area skin -- is risk free. Nobody in the world ever caught HIV or other STD or blood-borne infection in this manner. Don't worry about it and don't get tested.

I hope this information is helpful. Let me know if anything isn't clear.

HHH, MD
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25 months ago
Is this true even if it comes in direct contact with the genital's bare skin & mucous membranes?
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
25 months ago
Yes, even then. But try to think objectively. When you sit down, even unclothed, do your genitals (labia, vaginal opengin, etc) actually come in contact with the surface? Of course not. The human body evolved to protect the genital area from such contact. No risk at all. Move on without worry.---
25 months ago
Thank you for your answer Doctor  Handsfield. I do have a question. Is it possible that they reuse Needles to draw blood? My PCP is in Soho, NYC. But I have OCD when it comes to sharps and blood. Can they reuse it from another patient on me? I mean, if they have forgotten to change the needle? It may sound bizarre, but I dint know who could clarify this doubt of mine. Thanks
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
25 months ago
No clinics ever reuse needles.Blood drawing equipment is designed to make re-use almost impossible. It is probable that nobody in the US ever acquired HIV because of re-used needles -- certainly not in the last 30 years. No worries at all.

That concludes the two follow-up comments and replies included with each question, and so ends this thread. I hope the discussion has been helpful.
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