[Question #5292] Clarification Question

23 months ago
Hello,

This question is hopefully the last one I feel I need to ask you. Admittedly, these may be anxiety driven and I appreciate your expertise on this matter. I've had two sexual encounters I'm concerned about. Encounter A and Encounter B. For Encounter A, you had previously classified it as low risk (vaginal intercourse, broken condom, a little bit of menstrual blood, two college students). For encounter A, I have had 4th Generation tests at 24, 43 , 53 and 68 days roughly.  For Encounter B (once again broken condom, two college students in rural area of US) I've had several tests, notably at 23 days, 33 days, 43 days and 51 days. I was informed on this forum that neither of these encounters were of any real risk and that I should stop worrying. 
Questions:

1. Is 51 days conclusive for HIV-2? Considering the 4th Gen Duo only detects HIV-1 antigen.

2. When is the recommended test timing for Hepatitis C after an encounter? (just as a peace of mind test as I have never had one before) 

Thanks in advance.
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
23 months ago
You are re-asking questions already answered. In both your previous threads -- indeed, at least twice in each of them -- Dr. Hook told you these test results are conclusive. His opinion and mine never differ and I hope you didn't think either of us might have changed our mind in the past few days.

1) In the past 2 decades, there probably have been roughly 100 HIV2 infections diagnosed in the US, most of those in people who acquired their infections in endemic areas like west Africa, or their partners. So far there is little if any ongoing transmnission of HIV2 in this country. In any case, the antibody component of the test detects HIV2 by 6 weeks. The combination of your low risk exposure and negative test results amounts to 100% conclusive proof against both HIV1 and 2. Believe it and stolp asking!

2) Contrary to popular belief, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is NOT transmitted heterosexually, or sufficiently rarely to be ignored. The frequency of HCV in infected persons' opposite-sex partners is exactly the same as in the general population without such exposures. The latest quantitative estimate, from the Netherlands, is that if one partner has HCV, the chance of tranmission for each episode of unprotected vaginal sex is 1 in 190,000. That's equivalent to unprotected sex once daily with infected partners for 520 years before transmission might be likely. That is, zero. Because HCV isn't an STD, we have little experience testing for it on the basis of sexual exposures. But to my knowledge, it's conclusve 6 weeks after exposure.

Please note the forum does not permit repeated questions on the same topic or exposure. This will have to be your last one; future new questions about this exposure, testing, and your fears about HIV or other STDs will receive no reply and the posting fee will not be refunded. This policy is based on compassion, not criticism, and to reduce temptations to keep paying for questions with obvious answers. In addition, experience shows that continued answers tend to prolong users' anxieties rather than reducing them. Finally, such questions have little educational value for other users, one of the forum's main purposes. Thanks for your understanding. 


HHH, MD

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22 months ago
Hi,

I realize that I was told not to post on this same encounter. I'll pose a theoretical question: could ARS symptoms, such as a sore throat, start after 10 weeks?
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
22 months ago
No.---