[Question #5541] Re: Question #5463

21 months ago
Hey Doctors,

This will be my final question on this forum. Anyways, I've informed you of my risks. This includes two partners: 
Partner 1 (CSW) : Vaginal fluid on left hand, transferred to shaft of penis when opening fly of pants and possibly closing. 
Partner 2 (CSW 1 day after her unprotected encounter) : Kiss on the lips, possible exchange of saliva, but absolutely no tongue, and possible transfer of vaginal fluid to penis with my hand or hers (I am not circumcised), breast sucking. 

Anyways, I know you've told me these are no risk scenarios, but I tested negative using a 4th gen finger prick AG/AB test at 6 weeks. But of course, just when I'm about to get over this, on the 9th week, I get post nasal drip, causing a sore-ish throat, sneezing, coughing up mucus, NO FEVER though, and then seborrheic dermatitis on my chin, underneath my beard. It appeared all of the sudden when I started itching and it got red, greasy, and flakey. I just don't know what to do. I don't think I've experienced that before besides slightly dandruff on my head.  I feel like I have had no risks, but that symptom of seborrheic dermatitis has me terrified, it seems so specific to HIV. My friend won't let me test anymore unless I've had a risk..but I am just scared of putting others at risk. I promise you, those are my only risk factors. Never was my bare penis in a vagina, anus, or mouth. What should I do?  Thank you all. 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
21 months ago
Welcome back, but sorry you round it necessary.

One aspect that Dr. Hook may not have said explicitly, but is implicit in his advice in your previous thread, is that the HIV blood tests -- being among the most accurate diagnostic tests ever developed, for any medical condition -- always overrule all other considerations. No matter how typical someone's symptoms may be, and no matter how high the risk of HIV might have been,  the test results rule if done sufficiently long after exposure. For the AgAb tests, that time is 6 weeks, as you  apparently understand. In any case, your symptoms do not suggest HIV, which does not cause post nasal drip, cough, or bronchial mucus production. I don't know where you read that such symptoms are "specific to HIV"  -- none of them are, including seborrheic dermatitis. 

"What should I do?" Nothing at all except sit tight for a few days until your cold clears up. Forget HIV:  you were at no risk for it and do not have it. See a doctor if you remain concerned, or maybe a dermatologist if your suspected seborrheic dermatitis (a form of dandruff) is severe.

I hope these comments are helpful. Let me know if anything isn't clear.

HHH, MD
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21 months ago
Thank you Doctor Handsfield.
I just read about so many connections to seborrheic dermatitis and HIV that having it occur whilst also experiencing a cold made me feel as if my immune system was failing me. This is definitely a mental challenge as I know I haven’t had a risk..so I will try to tame my hyper-vigilance. I just don’t want to put others at risk, so proceeding without worry is hard, but necessary. It’s funny, I had attempted protected sex (couldn’t maintain erection and didn’t penetrate) and the condom had no failure after water checking it twice, a few days ago.. but this experience doesn’t frighten me nearly as much as these no risk experiences with the CSW..the mind is a powerful, fickle thing..at least mine is. So even with this seborrheic dermatitis occurring 9 weeks after these supposedly no risk experiences, it’s safe to move on? Given the 6 week negative AG/AB? And one more question! Is there any downside or difference with a rapid finger prick 4th gen AG/AB at planned parenthood vs a blood draw? That’s it. You can close this thread after your reply. Thank you so much. I hopefully will not have to post again. I really appreciate your service, as everyone who will probably read this does too.
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
21 months ago
Maybe a hundred or more symptoms and health problems are more common in people with HIV, including seborrheic dermatitis. However, most of those symptoms all are common in all human beings. Seb derm is present in about 5% of the population. That means something like 18 million people in the US. It's 10 times more common in people with HIV, i.e. roughly 50%. That works out to roughly 500,000 HIV infected people with seb derm, and 18 million others with seb derm without HIV. In other words, the large majority of people with SD co not have HIV. Your blood test results PROVE you are in the latter group, not the former. It proves your seb derm cannot be due to HIV. Believe it and move on without further worry.---
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