[Question #5697] Hiv Testing Risk

23 months ago
Dear Doctors,
Two days ago, I went for am HIV screening test just to quell my fears about a low risk event that happened a year ago. It was my second test regarding that event (the first was 10 weeks after). Both tests were the Alere/Abott rapid finger prick test,  Both were, of course, negative. 
However, the individual who administered the test was clearly ill and I suspect suffering from. HIV/AIDS. He did handle all the equipment with care. Washed his hands thoroughly, Wore rubber gloves throughout most of the process except when opening the little blood collection tube. A fresh lancet was used, as far as I could tell, and was capped until it was used.
I went to take the test to put my comcerns behind me (due to the event a year ago) and to resume sex with my regular partner. I have had no sexual activity since January. Now I am  concerned again. 
So my questions are.
1) was there any chance I could have been infected during this rapid finger stick test procedure?
2) Is the poke from a lancet enough to transmit HIV into the blood stream through the finger? Obviously there would have to have been blood on the lancet for that to happen and I saw none. Could HIV be tranferred through the collection tube?
3) Is it safe for me to have unprotected sex with my monogamous partner?
4) two days from this incident would be way too early for symptoms yes?
5) Should I be restested at 6 weeks?
This is really not how I saw this playing out. I was all ready to move on from this, but now my anxiety is high again. 
I anxioauly await your answers. Thank you for all you do!
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
23 months ago
Thanks for the thanks at the close of your question, However, you were warned in at least two of your several threads in the past about excessive anxiety driven questions about obvously zero risk events, and repeated questions about the same exposure. This is slightly different, since you're now concerned about getting HIV during the blood draw or testint process. That's sufficiently different that I will reply briefly.

1,2) Nobody ever gets HIV from having blood drawn or a fingerstick. No risk at all.
3) Because it is not possible you have HIV, of course it is safe to have sex with your partner.
4) Yes, 2 days is much too soon for HIV symptoms.
5) You should not have any more HIV tests unless and until you have an unprotected high risk sexual exposure.

I hope these comments are clear. If your unwarranted concerns about unrealiistic HIV concerns continue, professional counseling would make sense. Your fears are definitely beyond rational and suggest disordered thinking or emotions about it. I suggest counseling from compassion, not criticism.

HHH, MD
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23 months ago
Understood Doctor. And I do apologoze for the anxiety.  But this forum is so valuable. Its a remarkable service you, Dr. Hook and Terry warren provide. With the internet being what it is, its wonderful to be able to get no nonsese advice and practical information from experts and professionals. Regarding my specific testing question,  I simply assumed that if anyone would have come across or heard about instances in which HIV was transmitted in the way I described, it would be yourself or Dr. Hook due to your years of experience in the field.
So please accept my aplogies for the anxiety and my thanks again for all you do. You may close the thread if you like. Have a great day!! 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
23 months ago
Thanks for the kind comments. Have a nice day yourself.---
23 months ago
I suppose I will ask one more questions as a last follow up. HIV risks in medical procedures that involve needles occur when a hollow needle holds blood from an HIV infected patient and then accidentlaly sticks a medical worker such as a nurse or doctor. Since a lamcet is not hollow, it would not hold blood and thus could not infect someone correct? Thanks again Doctor!! 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
23 months ago
This is good logic. But the main point is that no patients ever get HIV from needlestick accidents. Only health care providers, and even these cases have been extremely rare in the past 20-30 years.

That condludes this thread. This definitely must be your last question on this topic. Any future ones WILL be deleted without reply and without refund. BUt I do hope the discussions have been helpful.
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