[Question #5882] Ngu from oral

18 months ago
Hi Dr i have read several post but would like to ask my own question.
I received oral from another man, two months later i felt sharp pain in penis and a constant burning aching feeling inside penis and penis head along with achy pelvis and legs. I seen a Dr who tested for gonorrhea and chlymydia both negative, he checked urine first void with dipstick said negative for wbc. I seen a urologist. He checked prostate, and urine for bacteria and wbc all normal. Symptoms went away about 5 months later. I started obsessing about it again this year and the pain in the penis came back. I seen my current Dr he did dipstick for wbc said no infection. And 10 panel STD test all negative.
Questions i have had a total of 7 dipstick test from Dr checking for wbc with first void but no swab Dr said not needed. Is this enough to exclude ngu? 
I have had this pain in the penis that comes and goes for most of the day for 4 months now. Dr said he has never seen ngu last longer than a month even without treatment. Have you? 
I haven't noticed discharge 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
18 months ago
Welcome to the forum. Thanks for your confidence in this forum.

For sure you do not have NGU or any other STD from the oral sex event several months ago. NGU symptoms do not take 2 months to show up; generally 1-2 weeks. Second, penile pain, aching and burning are not urethritis symptoms; discharge and pain or discomfort when passing urine are the only symptoms that go with NGU. You have had several professional examinations and no WBC on several occasions. Finally, your doctor is also correct that NGU would have cleared on its own by now, if you ever had it. I'll also point out that NGU from oral sex is generally believed to be harmless, with no serious health outcomes for either affected patients or their sex partners.

Not all pain means disease. This may be entirely psychological, and I would suggest you pursue that possibility with your doctors. You also could read about the male chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Google CPPS (spell it out) and start with the excellent Wikipedia article and information available from the Stanford University department of urology. If those descriptions seem to fit, discuss with your doctors. CPPS is not an STD.

I'm glad you don't have NGU or any other STD, and I hope that fact alone starts to help. Beyond that, I hope my other comments are helpful. Let me know if anything isn't clear.

HHH, MD
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18 months ago
Thank you for your reply i really appreciate it.
Before I asked a question on here i had called several STD clinics asking the same question and most clinics said that they do not use swabs to test people, only urine. Which was very confusing to me. 
One more question i also have noticed split stream when i urinate and dribbling after, would these symptoms be from any STD that you can think of? 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
18 months ago
I'm not sure why the use of urine by many clinics is "confusing". It's just a pragmatic fact of how they evaluate patients.

A split urine stream usually is not an STD symptom; itoften results from prostate gland problems, or from urethral stricture. The main exception is genital warts:  a wart in the urethra could cause this. If it continues, it would be reasonable to discuss it with your physician or, ideally, a urologist.
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18 months ago
Thanks for the rapid reply.
The reason i was confused was because I have read that the only way to rule out ngu was thru a swab. However most of the clinics said that they do not use a swab, they only use urine sample to detect wbc. 
But if that's the case wouldn't some ngu cases be missed? 
Thank you for your answered they have been very helpful! 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
18 months ago
Swabs are ideal to help diagnose NGU, but when there is no discharge or other symptoms, normally testing for NGU isn't done at all.

NGU from oral sex probably is harmless:  there are no known complications or serious outcomes either for affected men or their partners. So it really isn't something to worry about, especially when there are no symptoms to suggest NGU is present.

That completes the two follow-up comments and replies included with each question and so ends this thread. Please do your best to accept the reasoned, science based advice and reassurance you have had. I hope the discussion has been helpful.
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