[Question #6037] Conclusive HIV results

19 months ago
Hello Dr. I recently had several tests done and want to clarify window periods. 

I had an HIV antibody test done, 3rd and 4th generation is what the paperwork said. I don’t know what that means exactly. This test was done at 9 weeks post exposure. Negative results. I’ve read through endless posts and I’m pretty sure I’ve read that Dr. HHH says that a negative result at this time is conclusive. The exposure was brief oral no ejaculation.  Are these tests conclusive at this time? A few days shy of 10 weeks post exposure. 

Also tested Negative for Syphilis, Hep B & C. Are these all conclusive at this time?  9 weeks post exposure, also just a few days shy of 10 weeks?



Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
19 months ago
Welcome to the Forum.  Thanks for your question and for your confidence in our service.  Thanks as well for reviewing our responses to other clients.  One of our goals is to have our responses to others serve as sources of information to others.  

Answers.  Your results are conclusive.  4th generation tests, which detect both HIV antigen (the virus) and antibody (the body's response to the virus) are conclusive at any time when obtained more than 6 weeks after an exposure.  Further, I would add that even if your partner had HIV (statistically unlikely event), performance of oral sex very rarely leads to infection.

Your syphilis and hepatis B&C tests are likewise conclusive.

Bottom line, you are in the clear, no reason for further testing.  EWH
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19 months ago
Thank you so much for your response, Doctor! I would like to add another question in regard to this act. Like I previously mentioned, the oral sex was very brief maybe a minute or two, and no ejaculation. Is the risk very high for oral gonorrhea or chlamydia? This was a one time thing. A truly horrible mistake, I’m racked with guilt. I’ve got no symptoms, and this happened 2 1/2 months ago. 
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
19 months ago
Sure, I'll be glad to comment and hope that the information I provide will be helpful.

Most people do not have STIs.  Further, when exposed to a partner with STI, not all exposures lead to infection.  While there are no data on this subject, it is logical to think that shorter exposures are less likely to lead to infection and than the absence of ejaculation is likewise less likely to lead infection than if ejaculation occurs.  Finally, as far as the likelihood of infection is concerned, for some reason, chlamydia, the most common bacterial STI does not "like" the pharynx and, as a result, pharyngeal chlamydial infections are rather rare.  When one considers all of these variable, they add up to it being unlikely that you were infected. 

BUT, when gonorrhea or chlamydia occur in the throat they are usually asymptomatic.  Thus, if I were you, I would not worry.  OTOH, if you wish to be absolutely sure that you were not infected, the most reliable way is to get a throat swab tested for gonorrhea and chlamydia.  

As I said, personally, I would not be worried but the decision regarding testing is up to you.  I hope that this information is helpful. EWH
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19 months ago
Hello again, I have a final question for you in regard to this event. I did not add in my initial question that there was a bit of genital foreplay involved. Rubbing of the genitals but no penetration, this was also brief. I have had the following tests performed, which have come back negative. HIV, Syphilis, Hep C & B, HSV (blood) gonorrhea, and chlamydia (urine), I have had all three of the vaccines for HPV years ago. However, I recently came across a website describing mycoplasma genitalium. Is this something I should be concerned about? 

I have a partner, I have been with for years. We have resumed having unprotected sexual intercourse after receiving all of my negative results. Is this something that I could have and potentially give to him? Would you be worried about passing this along if you were in the same situation? Thank you. 
Edward W. Hook M.D.
Edward W. Hook M.D.
19 months ago
Thanks for the additional details regarding your encounter.  It does not change my assessment however.  There are several terms for non-penetrative sexual activity- frottage and mutual masturbation being amongst them  There is general agreement that these are no risk activities for STIs, including HIV.  Your tests prove that your low risk encounter did not lead to infection. As for Mycoplasma genitalium, this is a recently described organism whose significance in most persons is unclear and a subject of debate.  It is very rarely seen on the mouth and oropharynx.  I do not see a need for you to test for M. genitalium.

I see no reason for you to continue to worry about unprotected sex with your regular partner.  You have tested and you are in the clear.  time to put your casual encounter behind you and concentrate on the future.

As you know, we provide up to three responses to each client. This is my 3rd response. thus this thread will be closed shortly without further responses.  Take care.  Please don't worry.  EWH
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