[Question #7013] Trich question

10 months ago
Thanks again for my recent question being answered. I do have one more here:

I was involved in a relationship for about a month where we engaged in unprotected sex. After that relationship ended, I was tested for std’s with a basic panel offered and tested negative for everything. I was tested again a few weeks after my new relationship started and was again negative for everything. 

I realized recently that trich. Was not on the test panel. The person I was with first never complained or said anything about symptoms, I have not had symptoms (it’s been 4 months since that relationship ended) and the new partner has not complained of any symptoms. 

My question is, since I have seen information about very few people showing symptoms for trich, what is the likelihood that all three of us have shown no symptoms but it was still passed? 

Thank you!
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
10 months ago
I'm sorry you found it necessary to return. This quesiton was answered by Dr. Hook, who informed you that there are no STD risks from the exposure described. That includes trichomonas. This is nothing to be worried about.

HHH, MD
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10 months ago
I apologize I wasn’t clear on my question, let me try again,

This is a separate incident and question, the incident I’m speaking of is from having unprotected sex. The sex took place months ago, it was in a relationship that ended and I have now started another relationship that’s been going on for a few months as well. 

Basically my question is, since trich. Was the only thing I was not tested for, what is the likelihood that all three of us, me and my two female partners have it but none of us have symptoms? If that makes sense. 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
10 months ago
If you had unprotected vaginal sex, trichomonas is possible. It is not transmitted by any other sexual practices, or very rarely -- i.e. no risk from oral or anla sex, or from hand-genital contact. (Forgive me for assuming you were asking again about hte same exposure dsicussed with Dr. Hook.)

Trichomonas is not included in many routine test panels for several reasons. In men, it rarely causes symptoms and never any known complications. It is more important in women, but even in women, maany or most infections are asymptomatic and cause no complications. I have no way of judging the chance any of the three of you acquired trich from the exposure you have described. If either of the women have otherwise unexplained vaginal discharge, it would make sense for her to be tested for trichomonas. Otherwise it is optional. However, if you remain concerned, the trich DNA test is done on urine test and is offered by many laboratories. Test performance in males has not be conclusively determined; it certainly picks up most infections, but perhaps not all.

I hope that helps. Let me know if anytthing isn't clear.


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10 months ago
In your opinion, is the test accurate enough that If I tested negative you as a professional would be pretty sure I didn’t have it? 

I also looked up demographically if there was any information on it and from the little I could find it seemed that white females had a relatively low rate? I have learned from this site that usually the anxiety of thinking about having an STI usually makes it seem more likely to happen when in reality most people don’t have an STI. 
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
H. Hunter Handsfield, MD
10 months ago
Yes, a negative result almost always is reliable.

All STDs in industrialized countries are most common in socially and economically disadvantaged populations, and in the US all STDs are substantially more frequent in African Americans than in whites and those of Asian ethnicity. Latinos and Native Americans have higher rates than whites and lower than AA. All this includes trichomonas as well as gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, etc. (But not much difference in rates of HPV infection.)
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